UNL State Museum Vertebrate Paleontology Collections & Research

Vertebrate PaleontologyYesterday marked the beginning of the third Field School module, Vertebrate Paleontology, taught by Dr. Doug Boyer of Duke University. The opposite vertebrate fossil collections are the previous assortment of the Florida Geological Survey, parts of the Timberlane Analysis Organization assortment, and the UF Division of Zoology Fossil Bird Assortment (assembled by the late Professor Pierce Brodkorb).

Basic strengths of the collections are in its holdings from Early Permian terrestrial sediments, Late Triassic terrestrial sediments, Late Cretaceous marine and terrestrial sediments, Tertiary terrestrial sediments, and wealthy Quaternary cave deposits.

Though the fossil document is not complete, and our information of evolution will all the time be less than total, the proof for the progressive alternative of fossil forms has been enough to help the theory of evolution for over one hundred fifty years, effectively earlier than genetic mechanisms of evolutionary change had been understood.

Significantly sought are specimens of high quality that both fill a major hole within the collections, complement current analysis foci, or specimens whose removing from the public area would symbolize a serious loss to the scientific community and most of the people.

The collections have been begun under the steering of prominent Cincinnati doctor Daniel Drake and The Western Museum Society in 1818 and continued by members of the Western Academy of Pure Sciences (1835), the Cincinnati Society of Pure History (1870) and the Cincinnati Museum of Natural History (1957).

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